Social inequality and incidence of and survival from breast cancer in a population-based study in Denmark, 1994-2003

Kathrine Carlsen*, Mette Terp Høybye, Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton, Anne Tjønneland

*Corresponding author af dette arbejde

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftArtikelForskningpeer review

    Abstrakt

    We investigated the effects of socioeconomic, demographic and health-related indicators on the incidence of and survival from breast cancer diagnosed in 1994-2003 with follow-up through 2006 in Denmark using information from nationwide population-based registers. The analyses were based on data on 25,855 patients with breast cancer in a cohort of 3.22 million people born between 1925 and 1973 and aged ≥30 years. In general, the incidence of breast cancer increased with increasing social advantage, with unemployment or retirement, with increasing urbanicity and with being single or divorced. A history of admission for a psychiatric disorder increased the incidence of breast cancer. The overall relative short-term survival was high (96%), but survival improved with higher educational level and income. Whilst the relative 5-year survival after breast cancer was high (79%), there was significantly poorer relative survival amongst less advantaged and single women.

    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    Sider (fra-til)1996-2002
    Antal sider7
    TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Cancer
    Vol/bind44
    Udgave nummer14
    DOI
    StatusUdgivet - 1 sep. 2008

    Fingeraftryk

    Udforsk hvilke forskningsemner 'Social inequality and incidence of and survival from breast cancer in a population-based study in Denmark, 1994-2003' indeholder.

    Citationsformater